Compact20 takes place over the course of four days. The conference portion will feature over 100 sessions focused on civic engagement, community-engaged research, civic- and service-learning, institutional change, university-community partnerships and more. Join us the day before for the Biennial Summit of Presidents and Chancellors and our newest event, the Campus Compact Impact Awards Celebration, where we will celebrate individual and institutional impact.
 
These four days promise lots of room for learning and great opportunities for networking with faculty, staff, senior administrators, students, and community partners all dedicated to harnessing the power of higher education to achieve future with full participation for all.

Special Events

SUMMIT OF PRESIDENTS & CHANCELLORS
 
Presidents & chancellors will come together for inspiration and practical work on higher education’s role in creating an economy, a society, and a democracy with full participation.
 
CAMPUS COMPACT IMPACT AWARDS CELEBRATION
 
This new annual event from Campus Compact will recognize the achievement of individuals and institutions in advancing the public purposes of higher education.
 
PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS & COMMUNITY TOUR
 
There are several unique opportunities available to conference attendees. Join us Sunday for pre-conference sessions or Monday for a tour of the community.
 

Agenda at a Glance

Conference activities will take place from Sunday, March 29 through noon on April 1, 2020. The Compact20 conference will officially convene with the Keynote session on Monday, March 30, but conference attendees are invited to attend any of our special events on Sunday. The full agenda will be available online and in the conference app later this year. Please continue to check back!
 
7:00 AM
8:30 AM
Breakfast
8:30 AM
10:00 AM
Keynote
10:00 AM
10:30 AM
Break
10:00 AM
1:00 PM
Community Tours
10:30 AM
12:00 PM
Large breakouts
12:00 PM
1:15 PM
Lunch
1:15 PM
2:15 PM
Small breakouts
2:30 PM
3:30 PM
Small breakouts
3:30 PM
4:15 PM
Extended break
Poster session
4:15 PM
5:15 PM
General session
7:00 AM
8:30 AM
Breakfast
8:30 AM
9:30 AM
General session
9:45 AM
10:45 AM
Small breakouts
11:00 AM
12:00 PM
Small breakouts
12:00 PM
1:15 PM
Lunch
1:15 PM
2:15 PM
Small breakouts
2:30 PM
3:30 PM
Small breakouts
3:30 PM
4:00 PM
Break
4:00 PM
5:30 PM
General session
7:00 AM
8:30 AM
Breakfast
8:30 AM
9:30 AM
Small breakouts
9:45 AM
10:45 AM
Small breakouts
10:45 AM
11:15 AM
Break
11:15 AM
12:30 PM
Closing session

Pre-conference Sessions & Community Tours

Pre-conference Sessions

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM on Sunday, March 29 at the Hyatt Regency Seattle
 
HOW KNOWLEDGE CLAIMS CAN BE UNJUST AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT
 
Presented by John Saltmarsh, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Adam Bush, College Unbound; James Lin, GLIDE Foundation/Glide Memorial Church; John Loggins, University of San Diego; Chris Nayve, University of San Diego; Star Plaxton-Moore, University of San Francisco; Linda Caballero Sotelo, New Americans Museum
 
In her landmark 2007 book, Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing, the philosopher Miranda Fricker shows how individuals can be wronged in their roles as knowers. Fricker demonstrates that members of powerful groups devalue the knowledge claims of members of less powerful groups and, by denying the less powerful access to resources, prevent them from organizing information in ways that enable them to make effective knowledge claims. She calls these wrongs epistemic injustice. In this session, participants will come together as a learning community of engaged scholars to explore Fricker’s ideas and their application to the work of community engagement. We will examine how Fricker’s framework has been applied in recent scholarship on democratic participation and social change and consider its implications for transforming the work of community engagement. Participants will learn about the defining elements of epistemic justice/injustice, discover the potential epistemic and ethical repercussions of injustice for individuals and communities through participation in a story circle, and discuss how to promote epistemic justice in community engagement endeavors.
 
Admission: $100
 
LEARNING FROM SEATTLE (AND OTHER CITIES): PLACE-BASED COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FOR JUSTICE AND EQUITY
Pre-conference Session & Embedded Institute
 
Presented by: the Place-Based Justice Network, Nolizwe Nondabula, University of San Francisco and Jennifer Pigza, Saint Mary's College of California, with collaborators from University of San Diego, University of San Francisco, Saint Mary's College of California, Augsburg University, University of Pittsburgh, Loyola University Maryland, and Seattle University
 
The pace of change in communities across the country and around the world has deepened inequalities and tested the limits of higher education community engagement. This session is an opportunity to learn from and with practitioners of place-based community engagement strategies designed on the principle that communities and higher education institutions should work in sustained partnerships to identify pathways to greater equity, justice, and voice. Participants will learn about various examples of place-based engagement and will visit sites of action in Seattle.

This pre-conference session and embedded institute will include a pre-conference session from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM on Sunday, March 29, a community tour on Monday, March 30, and several recommended conference sessions and opportunities for reflection throughout the conference.
 
Admission: $125*
 
*The admission price for this session includes participation in Monday's community tour as well as embedded sessions and meetings throughout the conference. Read more about the community tours below.

Community Tours

10:00 AM - 1:00 PM on Monday, March 29
 
In Seattle, the University of Washington and Seattle University along with dozens of community partners have drawn upon the approach of place-based community engagement to develop comprehensive neighborhood-based strategies connecting campus and community. Through these site visits, participants will explore the historical and contemporary context of one Seattle neighborhood and learn how neighborhood and university leaders are co-creating new ways of partnering and pursuing positive social change. Site visit participants will initially gather together for a brief overview and framing before traveling in smaller groups to one of six distinct Seattle neighborhoods.
 
TOUR LOCATIONS:
UW launched this new place-based initiative in Jan 2019. Othello-UW Commons is a learning and collaboration space that cultivates partnerships that support Southeast Seattle’s vision of sustaining an equitable, inclusive and welcoming community.
For more info: https://www.washington.edu/othello/
El Centro de la Raza is a voice and a community hub that advocates for Seattle's Latino community. This site visit will explore the University of Washington's robust partnerships with El Centro and the organization's history and role in current social justice efforts.
In the Fall of 2016, University of Washington faculty members joined together on an Urban@UW retreat to brainstorm innovative ways that the University of Washington could step up in addressing the homelessness crisis in Seattle. They created a proposed plan that would focus on addressing youth homelessness in the University District, a neighborhood well-known for being youth-oriented. In July 2017, the Washington State Legislature passed a bill (Substitute Senate Bill 5883) that directed funds toward University of Washington to “support youth and young adults experiencing homelessness in the university district of Seattle”, including working with a lead community partner (now YouthCare) to support the project through community outreach and support. Since then, the Doorway Project has grown to include community members, undergraduate and graduate students, as well as leaders in faith communities, local businesses, and homelessness service providers.
The Seattle Chinatown-International District (C-ID) is the historic and cultural home of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino and Vietnamese American communities. Through strong community activism and long-term planning, the neighborhood is working to honor its historical and current cultural context while remaining equitable and affordable to all residents. Seattle University partners with organizations in the C-ID through a variety of cross-disciplinary efforts. Co-led by community and university leaders, this site visit will explore how place shapes partnerships in one of Seattle's oldest neighborhoods.
Yesler Terrace is the oldest public housing community West of the Mississippi and the first public housing community in the nation to be racially integrated. With support from a HUD Choice Neighborhood Grant, Seattle Housing Authority is currently facilitating a comprehensive neighborhood redevelopment of Yesler Terrace that will, upon completion, lead to a densely populated mixed-income neighborhood. Since 2012, Seattle University has served as the lead education partner on the Choice Neighborhood grant. In this role, the University has facilitated a collective impact effort uniting multiple neighborhood education partners to support Yesler children and their families. Co-led by leaders from Seattle Housing Authority and Seattle University, this site visit will include a visit to Yesler Terrace, Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, and several additional community organizations to explore the opportunities and challenges of supporting a neighborhood experiencing significant transition.
The Central District is historic and current home of Seattle's African American community. In recent years the neighborhood has faced significant pressures of gentrification and the displacement of long-term residents. Pursuing a vision of equity and justice, local leaders have mobilized to preserve the racial and cultural context of the neighborhood. Through visits to local schools, community organizations and public spaces, this visit will explore the complex role of universities in supporting equitable development while mitigating and interrupting institutionalized racism.
Admission: $50
 
These sessions include lunch and are part of the Place-Based Community Engagement Embedded Institute. All conference attendees can participate but priority will be given to individuals choosing to participate in the full Embedded Institute.

Call for Proposals

 
Campus Compact builds its conference agenda by inviting faculty, staff, students, and community partners to submit sessions for inclusion in this process. Our call for proposals deadline was June 30, 2019, and we are no longer accepting suggestions for sessions. If you have any questions about our proposals process, please contact us at conference@compact.org.